What Programs Are Helping To Prevent Teenage Pregnancy?

What are the programs to prevent teenage pregnancy?

Teen pregnancy prevention programs can include comprehensive sex education, HIV/STI prevention, youth development, service learning, abstinence approaches, or combinations thereof.

What are the strategies to prevent teenage pregnancy?

Methods

  • Oral Contraception…… “the pill”
  • Implanon.
  • Injectable contraception…..”the injection”
  • Male and female condoms.
  • Dual protection.
  • Emergency contraception (should be used within 5 days of unprotected sex, or condom breakage)- Toll free no: 0800246432.
  • Male and female sterilisation.

What are the risk factors that lead to teenage pregnancy?

Risk Factors for Teenage Pregnancy

  • Single parent households.
  • Single mothers’ dating behaviors.
  • Lack of positive family interaction.
  • Lack of parental supervision.
  • Lack of positive parent-child communication.
  • Mother was a teen parent.

What is pregnancy prevention program?

Learn about the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program The OPA Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program is a national, evidence-based grant program that funds diverse organizations working to prevent teen pregnancy across the United States.

What is the impact of teenage pregnancy in schools?

Having to balance motherhood and education simultaneously appears to be an overwhelming experience for teenage mothers. As a result, irregular school attendance and poor school performance during and after pregnancy often lead to the girls dropping out of school.

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How does teenage pregnancy affect the society?

Adolescent pregnancy can also have negative social and economic effects on girls, their families and communities. Unmarried pregnant adolescents may face stigma or rejection by parents and peers as well as threats of violence.

What are three consequences of teenage pregnancy?

Life as a young pregnant teen

  • low birth weight/premature birth.
  • anemia (low iron levels)
  • high blood pressure/pregnancy-induced hypertension, PIH (can lead to preeclampsia)
  • a higher rate of infant mortality (death)
  • possible greater risk of cephalopelvic disproportion* (the baby’s head is wider than the pelvic opening)

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